Last edited by Mazuhn
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Plants and their uses by the Chippewa Indian people found in the catalog.

Plants and their uses by the Chippewa Indian people

Priscilla Buffalohead

Plants and their uses by the Chippewa Indian people

teacher guide

by Priscilla Buffalohead

  • 284 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Anoka-Hennepin Independent School District No. 11 in [Minneapolis?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ojibwa Indians -- Ethnobotany,
  • Indians of North America -- Ethnobotany -- Great Lakes Region (North America)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementdeveloped by Priscilla Buffalohead
    ContributionsAnoka-Hennepin Independent School District No. 11 (Minn.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination20 p. ;
    Number of Pages20
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16032483M

    @ PLANTS Alternate Names Arrowhead, Indian potato, tule potato, wapato Uses Ethnobotanic: Sagittaria is an aquatic plant with tuberous roots that can be eaten like potatoes. Lewis and Clark found it at the mouth of the Willamette and considered it equal to the potato, and valuable for trade. Indian women collected it in shallow waterFile Size: KB. Published by the Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission Mazina’igan Supplement Growing up Ojibwe Boozhoo! (Hello!) Welcome to the Mazina’igan supplement, Growing Up Ojibwe. We would like you to spend some time with Tommy Sky, an Ojibwe boy from the Bad River Band of Ojibwe in Size: 2MB.

    Indian Uses of Native Plants. Mendocino County Historical Society, Fort Bragg. Ortiz, Bev. It Will Live Forever: Traditional Yosemite Indian Acorn Preparation. Berkeley: Heyday Books. Roos-Collins, M. The Flavors of Home: A Guide to Wild Edible Plants of the San Francisco Bay Area. Berkeley: Heyday Books. Sweet, M.   Medicinal and Other Uses of North American Plants: A Historical Survey with Special Reference to the Eastern Indian Tribes - Ebook written by Charlotte Erichsen-Brown. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Medicinal and Other Uses of North American Plants: Author: Charlotte Erichsen-Brown.

      Although the Ojibwa (Chippewa) are not primarily horticulturalists, Miss Densmorehas recordedthe usesto which different plants are put by membersof the tribe in Ontario and Minnesota. 39 varieties serve as food; wild rice and maple syrup are the most important, but a wide range of herbs is employedfor seasoningor as by: 1. "Learn the natural ways of the Chippewa Indians with this great book from Dover." — Texas Kitchen and Garden and More The uses of plants — for food, for medicine, for arts, crafts, and dyeing — among the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota and Wisconsin show the great extent to which they understood and utilized natural resources.


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Plants and their uses by the Chippewa Indian people by Priscilla Buffalohead Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Learn the natural ways of the Chippewa Indians with this great book from Dover." — Texas Kitchen and Garden and More The uses of plants — for food, for medicine, for arts, crafts, and dyeing — among the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota and Wisconsin show the great extent to which they understood and utilized natural resources/5(40).

PEOPLE; search. Search metadata Uses of plants by the Chippewa Indians by Densmore, Frances, Publication date Topics Ojibwa Indians, Ethnobotany, Indians of North America Publisher This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library.

The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa, or Saulteaux are an Anishinaabe people of Canada and the northern Midwestern United are one of the most numerous indigenous peoples north of the Rio Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native.

Uses of plants by the Chippewa Indians [Hardcover] [Frances Densmore] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Lang: eng, Pages Reprinted in with the help of original edition published long back[]. This book is in black & white.

work done among Wisconsin Indians to discover their present uses of native or introduced plants and, insofar as is possible, the history of these plant uses by their ancestors.

As far back as Hoffman. reported that the medicinal lore of the Ojibwe would soon be gone. But thirty-two years later, it is still partially recalled and practicedFile Size: KB.

Title. Uses of plants by the Chippewa Indians / By. Densmore, Frances, Type. Book Material. Published material. The use of plants for medicine was a specialty of the Chippewa and much of the knowledge of plants gathering and medicinal properties is passed down generation to generation.

The myriad of plants and their uses would encompass its own book. Those discussed in this section are but a few of the more common historically used plants.

This is a list of plants used by the indigenous people of North America. For lists pertaining specifically to the Cherokee, Navajo, and Zuni, see Cherokee ethnobotany, Navajo ethnobotany, and Zuni ethnobotany. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Abronia fragrans (snowball-sand verbena) Used as both food and medicine.

Plants and Their Uses by the Chippewa Indian People: Teachers guide. Minneapolis, MN: American Indian Language & Culture Project. This is a teachers guide that provides Teacher Information, Learner Outcomes, Student Worksheets, and Student Activities to be used with the book, Plants and Their Uses, by the Chippewa Indian People.

The majority of Chippewa Indians speak the English language. Nonetheless, a large number of Chippewa also speak their native tongue – the Ojibway language. Modern day Chippewa Indians live like other people. For example, young children attend school and are required to complete chores around the home.

It is the responsibility of the father to. "Learn the natural ways of the Chippewa Indians with this great book from Dover." — Texas Kitchen and Garden and More The uses of plants — for food, for medicine, for arts, crafts, and dyeing — among the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota and Wisconsin show the great extent to which they understood and utilized natural resources/5(46).

Chippewa. “Chippewa” is an English people call themselves Anishinaabeg, which means origi-nal people. Chippewa and Ojibwe are versions of names given them by other name may have described the puckered style Many years ago Ojibwe built homes called wiigiwaams (wigwams) by covering a sapling frame with birch bark.

Desert Indians: Plants Indian use of Native Plants. In the desert, Indians found native plants and other natural objects that not only ensured their survival but also formed the foundation for much of their culture.

The desert provided food, clothing, tools, weapons, medicine, cooking implements, trade items, toys and games, the means for artistic expression, and spiritual.

- Explore ritathiance's board "Anishinabe Stories & Books", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Books, Native american and First nations pins.

Gilmore MR. Some Chippewa uses of plants. Mich Acad Sci Arts Lett. ; – Reagan AB. Plants used by the Bois Fort Chippewa (Ojibwa) Indians of Minnesota. Wisc Archaeol. ; 7 (4)– Smith HH. Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians. Bulletin of the Public Museum of The City of Milwaukee.

; – Stowe GC. Plants used Cited by: The Chippewa people living south of Lake Superior in the late s relied primarily on fishing and hunting, as well as cultivating maize and wild rice. Their possession of wild-rice fields was one of the chief causes of their wars with the Dakota, Fox, and other nations.

At about this same time, they came into possession of firearms and were. Medicinal plants have been used in traditional health care systems since prehistoric times and are still the most important health care source for the vast majority of the population around the world [e.g.

[1–6]].It is estimated that % of people worldwide rely on traditional herbal medicine to meet their primary health care needs [7, 8].

Cite this Record. Uses of Plants By the Chippewa Indians. Frances Densmore. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin. (tDAR id: )Cited by: The Chippewa Indians have about different bands (which includes the turtle mountain band) of Indians in the US.

In fact, the Chippewa are one of the largest Native American Indian tribes in the United States. The people of this Northeast American Indian tribe are also referred to as Ojibwarich, Ojibway, and Ojibwe.

How Indians Use Wild Plants for Food, Medicine & Crafts (Native American) eBook: Densmore, Frances: : Kindle Store. Ojibway Indian Fact Sheet. This website was written for young people seeking Chippewa Indian information for school or home-schooling reports.

We encourage students and teachers to visit our main Ojibwa language and culture pages for in-depth information about the Ojibway/Chippewa tribe, but here are our answers to common questions asked by kids, with Ojibway pictures and .Chippewa Indians. Herbs are a common staple in American cooking.

In fact, herbs are the forefathers of taste. The Chippewa Indians and all of the other Indian tribes of the times have been using herbs for hundreds of years, not only for .The Roles of Men and Women. In the Chippewa culture, the roles of men and women were much were domestic, taking care of the home and the farm.

They planted the seeds and took care of the crops, in addition to their responsibilities at home when it came to children and the preparation of food.